INP 7097 004

JOB ANALYSIS

Fall 2004

 

Contact Information:

 

Instructor: Michael T. Brannick, Ph.D.

Office: PCD 4121

Email: mbrannic@luna.cas.usf.edu

Mail Box: PCD 4118 G

Fax: (813) 974-4617

Voice Mail: (813) 974-0478

 

 

 

Course Information:

 

Class meets: PCD 2124

 

Lecture: M, 9:00 11:50 a.m.

 

Office Hours: W 2:00 3:00 PM

Appointments available by request

 

 

Textbook:

 

Brannick, M. T., & Levine, E. L. (2002). Job Analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, you will be familiar with several kinds of job analysis, including the units of work, the types of descriptors, and the methods of analysis. You should be able to choose a type of job analysis best suited for answering specific questions of interest to you and to an organization. You should be able to go into an organization and be confident of doing a solid job analysis for their needed purpose(s). You should also have some idea of the current literature on job analysis and current issues worthy of research.

 

Grades

Grades will be based on your job analysis projects and class presentation and discussion. Final grades are based on a percentage of total points (80-89 percent = B, 90+ =A, etc.).

 

Project 1: Interview and task inventory development.

 

This assignment will give you initial experience in job analysis. You choose a job to analyze. The job must be one that you have not held, so that you are not already familiar with its contents. Get permission to study the job from appropriate authorities. Then

 

(1) Look up the job in O*NET

(2) Interview at least one incumbent and one supervisor of the job.

(3) Observe at least one incumbent performing at least part of the job.

 

 

 

Products:

 

(a) a narrative (one paragraph) job description

(b) a list of tasks suitable for a task inventory (10 to 100 tasks)

(c) a description of the process of analyzing the job (1 to 2 pages documenting what you did)

 

Prepare a formal paper (about 5 pages, tops). You will present the paper orally in class. Use some kind of visual aid in your preparation (e.g., handout, overhead, powerpoint, etc.). Be sure to share your job description and some or all of your task statements. The idea is a round table discussion of what you learned, what difficulties you encountered, etc., that will be useful to you and others in subsequent job analyses. You don't have to administer a task inventory, just develop the task list.

 

Point total: 100

 

Project 2: Job Analysis for Selection.

 

The second project is to give you experience in doing job analysis in an organization for personnel selection. You may work in groups of size 1 to 3. You need to (a) find an organization and job (b) conduct a job analysis, and (c) recommend one or more tests to the class (a copy can go to the organization, but is not required). You do not need to actually buy or construct a test. Rather, you need to identify the KSAOs needed for the job and to identify or create ways to measure them. You should consider effectiveness, efficiency and fairness in your choice of tests and measures.

 

Products:

 

(a) a narrative (one paragraph) job description

(b) a list of KSAOs and their links to the tasks/job activities

(c) a list of tests/assessments, the rationale for their choice, and a description of their acquisition/development.

 

Prepare a formal paper (about 5 to 10 pages, tops). You will present the paper orally in class. Use some kind of visual aid in your preparation (e.g., handout, overhead, powerpoint, etc.). Be sure to share your job description, development of KSAOs, and justification for the type of test you plan to use. The idea is a round table discussion of what you learned, what difficulties you encountered, etc., that will be useful to you and others in subsequent job analyses. You don't have to administer tests, just develop measurement ideas linked to the KSAOs.

 

Point total: 150

 

Class presentation and discussion.

 

I expect you to read the assigned material prior to attending class. I will spend some time lecturing to introduce a topic or to add some fine points. We will discuss material assigned for that day. We will apply some of the techniques we are learning about during class period in more of a workshop format than a lecture and discussion format. Please be alert and constructive during these activities. For each article or chapter, please write one question or comment (can by anything) and bring it to class along with a copy to turn in to me. These will help form the basis for some of the class discussions.

 

Point total: 50

 

        Recording of class notes for purpose of sale is forbidden.

        See me if you need special accommodation for any aspect of this class.

        Religious observances: Notify me in writing by the second class period if you will miss class due to major religious holidays. Please provide me with a list of dates of classes you will miss and the name(s) of the holiday(s) observed.

 

Course Calendar

 

Week

Date

Topic

Assignment

1.

Aug 23

Introduction

B & L, Chapter 1

2.

Aug 30

Work Oriented Methods

B & L, Chapter 2; Christal & Weissmuller; Flanagan; Manson, Levine & Brannick

3.

Sep 3

Labor Day Holiday

 

4.

Sep 13

Worker Oriented Methods

B & L, Chapter 3; McCormick & Jeanneret; Shippmann et al (2000).

5.

Sep 20

Doing a Job Analysis study

B & L, Chapter 9; Dierdorff & Wilson; Voskuijl & van Sliedregt

6.

Sep 27

Hybrid Methods

B & L, Chapter 4; Prien, Prien & Gamble; Maurer & Tross; Sackett & Laczo

7.

Oct 4

Project 1 due

Presentations

8.

Oct 11

Management & Teams

B & L, Chapter 5; Morrison, Payne & Wall

Joan Brannick visit 10:00 a.m.

9.

Oct 18

Legal Aspects

B & L, Chapter 6; Spector, Jex & Chen; Tross & Maurer; Wilson

10.

Oct 25

Job description & performance appraisal

B & L, Chapter 7; Borman, Campbell & Pulakos

11. Nov 1

Compensation, Design

B & L, Chapter 7; Kochhar & Armstrong; Morgeson & Campion (2002); Campion & Thayer

12. Nov 8

Staffing

B & L, Chapter 8; Robertson & Smith; Allworth & Hesketh; Gutenberg et al.; Jeanneret & Strong

13. Nov 15

Training

B & L, Chapter 8; McKillip; Jones, Sanchez, et al.; Tett & Burnett

14. Nov 22

Project 2 reports

Presentations

15. Nov 29

Future trends

B & L Chapter 10; Harvey & Wilson; Sanchez & Levine; Morgeson & Campion (2000)

 

 

 


References (required readings)

 

 

1.      Allworth, E., & Hesketh, B. (2000). Job requirements biodata as a predictor of performance in customer service roles. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 8, 137-147.

 

2.      Borman, W. C., Campbell, C. H., & Pulakos, E. D. (2001). Analyzing jobs for performance measurement. In J. P. Campbell & D. J. Knapp (Eds.) Exploring the limits in personnel selection and classification (pp. 157-180). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

 

3.      Campion, M. A., & Thayer, P. W. (1985). Development and field evaluation of an interdisciplinary measure of job design. Journal of Applied Psychology, 70, 29‑43.

4.      Christal, R. E., & Weissmuller, J. J. (1988). Job-task inventory analysis. In S. Gael (Ed.) The job analysis handbook for business, industry and government (Vol. 2) pp. 1036-1050. New York: Wiley.

 

5.      Dierdorff, E. C., & Wilson, M. A. (2003). A meta-analysis of job analysis reliability. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88, 635-646.

 

6.      Flanagan, J. C. (1954). The critical incident technique. Psychological Bulletin, 51, 327‑358.

 

7.      Gutenberg, R. L., Arvey, R. D., Osburn H. G., Jeanneret, P. R. (1983). Moderating effects of decision-making/information processing job dimensions on test validities. Journal of Applied Psychology, 68, 602-608.

 

8.      Harvey, R. J., & Wilson, M. A. (2000). Yes Virginia, there is an objective reality in job analysis. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 21, 829-854.

 

9.      Jeanneret, P. R., & Strong, M. H. (2003). Linking O*Net job analysis information to job requirement predictors: An O*Net application. Personnel Psychology, 56, 465-492.

 

10.  Jones, R. G., Sanchez, J. I., Parameswaran, G., Phelps, J., Shoptaugh, C., Willimans, M. White, S. (2001). Selection or training? A two-fold test of the validity of job-analytic ratings of trainability. Journal of Business and Psychology, 15, 363-389.

 

11.  Kochhar, D. S., & Armstrong, T. J. (1988). Designing jobs for handicapped employees. In S. Gael (Ed.) The job analysis handbook for business, industry and government (Vol. 1) pp. 288-302. New York: Wiley.

 

12.  Manson, T. M., Levine, E. L., & Brannick, M. T. (2000). The construct validity of task inventory ratings: A multitrait-multimethod analysis. Human Performance, 13, 1-22.

 

13.  Maurer, T. J., & Tross, S. A. (2000). SME committee vs. field job analysis ratings: Convergence, cautions, and a call. Journal of Business and Psychology, 14, 489-499.

14.  McCormick, E. J., Jeanneret, P. R. (1988). Position analysis questionnaire (PAQ). In S. Gael (Ed.) The job analysis handbook for business, industry and government (Vol. 2) pp. 825-842. New York: Wiley.

 

15.  McKillip, J. (2001). Case studies in job analysis and training evaluation. International Journal of Training and Development, 5, 283-289.

 

16.  Morgeson, F. P., & Campion, M. A. (2000). Accuracy in job analysis: toward an inference-based model. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 21, 819-827.

 

17.  Morgeson, F. P., & Campion, M. A. (2002). Minimizing tradeoffs when redesigning work: Evidence from a longitudinal quasi-experiment. Personnel Psychology, 55, 589-612.

 

18.  Morrison, D., Payne, R. L., Wall, T. D. (2003). Is job a viable unit of analysis? A multilevel analysis of demand-control-support models. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 8, 209-219.

 

19.  Prien, E. P., Prien, K. O., & Gamble, L. G. (2004). Perspectives on nonconventional job analysis methodologies. Journal of Business and Psychology, 18, 337-348.

 

20.  Robertson, I. T., & Smith, M. (2001). Personnel selection. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 74, 441-472.

 

21.  Sackett, P. R., & Laczo, R. M. (2003). Job and work analysis. In W. C. Borman and D. R. Ilgen (Eds.) Handbook of Psychology: Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Vol. 12 (pp. 21-37). New York: Wiley.

 

22.  Sanchez, J. I., & Levine, E. L. (2000). Accuracy or consequential validity: which is the better standard for job analysis data? Journal of Organizational Behavior, 21, 809-818.

 

23.  Shippmann, J. S., Ash, R. A., Battista, M., Carr, L., Eyde, L. D., Hesketh, B., Kehoe, J., Pearlman, K., Prien, E. P., & Sanchez, J. I. (2000). The practice of competency modeling. Personnel Psychology, 53, 703-740.

 

24.  Spector, P. E., Jex, S. M., & Chen, P. Y. (1995). Relations of incumbent affect-related personality traits with incumbent and objective measures of characteristics of jobs. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 16, 59-65.

 

25.  Tett, R. P., & Burnett, D. D. (2003). A personality trait-based interactionist model of job performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88, 500-517.

 

26.  Tross, S.A. , & Maurer, T. J. (2000). The relationship between SME job experience and job analysis ratings: Findings with and without statistical control. Journal of Business and Psychology, 15, 97-110.

 

27.  Voskuijl, O. F. & van Sliedregt, T. (2002). Determinants of interrater reliability of job analysis: A meta-analysis. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 18, 52-62.

 

28.  Wilson, Mark. A. (1997). The validity of task coverage ratings by incumbents and supervisors: Bad news. Journal of Business and Psychology, 12, 85-95.